Hedgemon

(Other blog: ahedgethinks.blogspot.)

Jul 25

flitterling:

Yesterday’s Sunset by Abi Ashra | Tumblr 

©All Rights Reserved

(via mermaidinamanhole)


“Buggre Alle this for a Larke. I amme sick to mye hart of typefettinge. Master Biltonn if no Gentelmann, and master Scagges noe more than a tighte fisted Southwarke Knobbefticke. I telle you, onn a daye laike thif Ennywone withe half an oz. of Sense shoulde bee oute in the Sunneshain, ane nott Stucke here alle the liue-long daie inn thif mowldey olde By-Our-Lady Workefhoppe.” Ezekiel 48:5 (via colonelgeorgespunmercy)

(via pasiphile)


(via nohetero)


joyceanfartboner:

petedkat:

From a Japanese CC commercial

Rina Takeda

Studying karate since she was ten, Rina is black belt in Ryukyu Shorin-ryu Karate.

yo what thef ukc

(via epic-humor)


willow-wanderings:

thebicker:

^^^^^HOW PRIVILEGE WORKS.

YES THIS IS EXACTLY IT.

(via epic-humor)


oh-totoro:

YAY!!! I cannot believe it, but I have reached a phenomenal 50,000 followers! That’s 49,500 more than I ever hoped to have, hehe, and to celebrate and say thank you for your unbelievable support, I want to give a little something back.

There will be three lucky winners who will each win one of these prizes…

1ST PRIZE:
The large Oh-Totoro (grey) plushie.

2ND PRIZE:
The medium Chu-Totoro (blue) plushie.

3RD PRIZE:
The small Chibi-Totoro (white) plushie.

All three of these plushies are genuine Japanese merchandise and feature the official “Approved by Studio Ghibli” sticker, so are very high quality! ^___^


HOW TO ENTER:

1. You must be following oh-totoro
     - I will check this after making the draw and redraw if necessary.
2. You must reblog this post.
     - Each reblog counts as an entry. You may reblog once per day.
3. You must be willing to give me your postal address.
     - Well, this should be obvious.
4. A photo of each winner with their prize would be greatly appreciated so I can reblog it to oh-totoro, but this is not a requirement.


DATE OF DRAW:

Thursday 31st July 2014 (and will be announced a week later)

I will contact the three winners on this date and give them 48 hours to respond to my Ask. If I don’t receive a response, I will nudge up those who have responded and redraw the lowest prize. This will also be the case if Asks are not enabled. Make sure your Asks are enabled!


WHO CAN ENTER:

Anybody can enter. I will post to any country. So don’t miss out!

Good luck! x


pizzaforpresident:

uglyreckless:

kwadi:

kwadxploren:

My cousin, ashamed after building a chair from IKEA.

this is one of the best posts i have ever seen

OH MY GOD

I laugh every time I see this

pizzaforpresident:

uglyreckless:

kwadi:

kwadxploren:

My cousin, ashamed after building a chair from IKEA.

this is one of the best posts i have ever seen

OH MY GOD

I laugh every time I see this

(via epic-humor)


For many of these women, the reading experience begins from a place of seething rage. Take Sara Marcus’ initial impression of Jack Kerouac: “I remember putting On the Road down the first time a woman was mentioned. I was just like: ‘Fuck. You.’ I was probably 15 or 16. And over the coming years I realized that it was this canonical work, so I tried to return to it, but every time I was just like, ‘Fuck you.’” Tortorici had a similarly visceral reaction to Charles Bukowski: “I will never forget reading Bukowski’s Post Office and feeling so horrible, the way that the narrator describes the thickness of ugly women’s legs. I think it was the first time I felt like a book that I was trying to identify with rejected me. Though I did absorb it, and of course it made me hate my body or whatever.” Emily Witt turned to masculine texts to access a sexual language that was absent from books about women, but found herself turned off by their take: “many of the great classic coming-of-age novels about the female experience don’t openly discuss sex,” she says in No Regrets. “I read the ones by men instead, until I was like, ‘I cannot read another passage about masturbation. I can’t. It was like a pile of Kleenex.”

This isn’t just about the books. When young women read the hyper-masculine literary canon—what Emily Gould calls the “midcentury misogynists,” staffed with the likes of Roth, Mailer, and Miller—their discomfort is punctuated by the knowledge that their male peers are reading these books, identifying with them, and acting out their perspectives and narratives. These writers are celebrated by the society that we live in, even the one who stabbed his wife. In No Regrets, Elif Bautman talks about reading Henry Miller for the first time because she had a “serious crush” on a guy who said his were “the best books ever,” and that guy’s real-life recommendation exacerbated her distaste for the fictional. When she read Miller, “I felt so alienated by the books, and then thinking about this guy, and it was so hot and summertime … I just wanted to kill myself. … He compared women to soup.”

In No Regrets, women writers talk about what it was like to read literature’s “midcentury misogynists.” (via becauseiamawoman)

(via heartthrob)


epic-humor:

s0uthernbabe:

Man forgets he is married after surgery (x)

OMG

that “OH, MY GOD! I HIT THE JACKPOT!”


Cross out what you’ve already read. Six is the average.

jaimelannistears:

Pride and Prejudice - Jane Austen
The Lord of the Rings - JRR Tolkien
Jane Eyre - Charlotte Bronte
Harry Potter series - JK Rowling
To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee
The Bible - Council of Nicea
Wuthering Heights - Emily Bronte
Nineteen Eighty Four - George Orwell
His Dark Materials - Philip Pullman
Great Expectations - Charles Dickens
Little Women - Louisa M Alcott
Tess of the D’Urbervilles - Thomas Hardy
Catch 22 - Joseph Heller
Rebecca - Daphne Du Maurier
The Hobbit - JRR Tolkien
Birdsong - Sebastian Faulk
Catcher in the Rye - JD Salinger
The Time Traveller’s Wife - Audrey Niffenegger
Middlemarch - George Eliot
Gone With The Wind - Margaret Mitchell
The Great Gatsby - F Scott Fitzgerald
Bleak House - Charles Dickens
War and Peace - Leo Tolstoy
The Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams
Brideshead Revisited - Evelyn Waugh
Crime and Punishment - Fyodor Dostoyevsky
Grapes of Wrath - John Steinbeck
Alice in Wonderland - Lewis Carroll
The Wind in the Willows - Kenneth Grahame
Anna Karenina - Leo Tolstoy
David Copperfield - Charles Dickens
Chronicles of Narnia - CS Lewis
Emma - Jane Austen
Persuasion - Jane Austen
The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe - CS Lewis
The Kite Runner - Khaled Hosseini
Captain Corelli’s Mandolin - Louis De Bernieres
Memoirs of a Geisha - Arthur Golden
Winnie the Pooh - AA Milne
Animal Farm - George Orwell
The Da Vinci Code - Dan Brown
One Hundred Years of Solitude - Gabriel Garcia Marquez
A Prayer for Owen Meaney - John Irving
The Woman in White - Wilkie Collins
Anne of Green Gables - LM Montgomery
Far From The Madding Crowd - Thomas Hardy
The Handmaid’s Tale - Margaret Atwood
Lord of the Flies - William Golding
Atonement - Ian McEwan
Life of Pi - Yann Martel
Dune - Frank Herbert
Cold Comfort Farm - Stella Gibbons
Sense and Sensibility - Jane Austen
A Suitable Boy - Vikram Seth
The Shadow of the Wind - Carlos Ruiz Zafon
A Tale Of Two Cities - Charles Dickens
Brave New World - Aldous Huxley
The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time - Mark Haddon
Love In The Time Of Cholera - Gabriel Garcia Marquez
Of Mice and Men - John Steinbeck
Lolita - Vladimir Nabokov
The Secret History - Donna Tartt
The Lovely Bones - Alice Sebold
Count of Monte Cristo - Alexandre Dumas
On The Road - Jack Kerouac
Jude the Obscure - Thomas Hardy
Bridget Jones’s Diary - Helen Fielding
Midnight’s Children - Salman Rushdie
Moby Dick - Herman Melville
Oliver Twist - Charles Dickens
Dracula - Bram Stoker
The Secret Garden - Frances Hodgson Burnett
Notes From A Small Island - Bill Bryson
Ulysses - James Joyce
The Bell Jar - Sylvia Plath
Swallows and Amazons - Arthur Ransome
Germinal - Emile Zola
Vanity Fair - William Makepeace Thackeray
Possession - AS Byatt
A Christmas Carol - Charles Dickens
Cloud Atlas - David Mitchell
The Color Purple - Alice Walker
The Remains of the Day - Kazuo Ishiguro
Madame Bovary - Gustave Flaubert
A Fine Balance - Rohinton Mistry
Charlotte’s Web - EB White
The Five People You Meet In Heaven - Mitch Albom
Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
The Faraway Tree Collection - Enid Blyton
Heart of Darkness - Joseph Conrad
The Little Prince - Antoine De Saint-Exupery
The Wasp Factory - Iain Banks
Watership Down - Richard Adams
A Confederacy of Dunces - John Kennedy Toole
A Town Like Alice - Nevil Shute
The Three Musketeers - Alexandre Dumas
Hamlet - William Shakespeare
Charlie and the Chocolate Factory - Roald Dahl
Les Miserables - Victor Hugo

what an arbitrary list! recent pop bestsellers and classics. i’d like to know who determined “6” was average…

(via bluberryattack)


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